Blog RSS

Meet five U.S. presidents who spent part of their early careers shaping young minds in the classroom.   1. John Adams When John Adams graduated from Harvard College in 1755, the 19-year-old Massachusetts native found himself at a crossroads. As a child, he’d considered formal education tiresome and yearned to be like his father, a farmer. Now, however, he was torn between the ministry career his parents hoped he’d choose and his growing interest in the law. While he weighed his options, the future second U.S. president taught a dozen boys and girls in a one-room schoolhouse in Worcester, Massachusetts,...

Read more

Abraham Lincoln -

Born in Kentucky on February 12, 1809—Abraham Lincoln was a man who without a doubt was able to improve our nation above and beyond typical societal bounds. Lincoln did not attend college and only received about eighteen months of a formal education. However, he was able to gain most of his knowledge through his travels and was an avid reader who had a lust for learning.  Lincoln grew up in humble surroundings as the son of a farmer. As he grew up, he decided to make the move to Salem, Massachusetts where his ability to read and write became his...

Read more

Check out the obstacles that five of our commanders-in-chief overcame on their way to the Oval Office.   1. George Washington’s Aggressive Nature “Had he been born in the forests,” said Gilbert Stuart, who spent hours with George Washington painting the stolid portrait made famous on the dollar bill, “he would have been the fiercest man among the savage tribes.” George Washington’s political career was built on his performance leading American forces in the Revolutionary War, but his aggressive nature almost lost the fight for American independence before it had, in earnest, begun. In June 1776, Washington decided–against his generals’...

Read more

John F. Kennedy -

Born in the Boston suburb of Brookline on May 29, 1917 – John F. Kennedy certainly gave his all to his country. After attending the most prestigious private schools throughout his childhood and pre-adolescence he ultimately ended up pursuing his bachelor’s degree at none other then Harvard University. At the end of his studies he received a bachelors of arts in government with a concentration in international affairs. Following this, Kennedy decided to go to business school at Stanford University, but after one semester he decided to audit his classes and help his father with writing his memoir. A few...

Read more

While it’s become synonymous with the blue and white jetliner stamped with the words “United States of America,” Air Force One is actually a call sign applied to any aircraft carrying the American president. The name was created following an incident in 1953, when President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s plane found it was using the same call sign—“8610”—as a nearby Eastern Airlines commercial flight. Yet while Eisenhower was the first chief executive to travel aboard a plane designated “Air Force One,” he was neither the first to fly nor the first to have his own airplane.The history of presidential aviation dates...

Read more