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George W. Bush -

Born in New Haven Connecticut on July 6, 1946 – George Walker Bush was the first child of George Herbert Walker Bush (the 41st U.S. President) and Barbara Pierce. Throughout his youth, Bush attended public schools in Texas until he was put into the Kinkaid School (a prep school) for the eighth grade. The following year he attended Phillips Academy where he played basketball and was a part of the cheerleading team. Post- high school, Bush attended Yale University and received his Bachelor of Arts degree in history. Bush then applied to the University of Texas School of Law and...

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Bill Clinton -

Born in Hope, Arkansas on August 19, 1946—Clinton struggled in his early years as his father (William Jefferson Blythe Jr.) passed away in an auto-mobile accident just three months before his birth. Clinton was raised primarily by his grandparents, because his mother (Virginia Clinton Kelley) decided to attend and complete nursing school. Clinton attended St. Johns Catholic Elementary School, and his mother returned with his stepfather (Roger Clinton) who ended up adopting him as his own and giving him his last name as well. Clinton later went on to study at Hot Springs High School, where he dedicated his teen...

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With the election on the horizon, take a look at five famous instances where candidates proved the oddsmakers wrong.   1. 1844: James K. Polk The 11th President of the United States “Who is James K. Polk?” That was the question on everyone’s lips in 1844, when an obscure former congressman and Tennessee governor was announced as the Democratic nominee for president. Onetime commander in chief Martin Van Buren had been the presumptive favorite for the nomination, but following a heated convention, Polk had emerged as the dark horse candidate on the ninth ballot. Few believed the 49-year-old stood a...

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These seven presidential elections brought out the wild side in our nation’s democratic process.   1. 1800 As fans of the Broadway smash “Hamilton” well know, this election went down just as the nation’s first political parties were taking shape. At the time, the electoral college process was far different than it is today. Each elector voted for two candidates; the one with the most votes became president, while the runner-up became vice president. Under this system, Thomas Jefferson and his chosen V.P. pick, Aaron Burr, tied for first place 73-73 due to a communication error among Democratic-Republican electors (or...

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From James Monroe’s Revolutionary War heroics to George H.W. Bush’s brush with death during World War II, get the facts on the wartime experiences of seven American chief executives.   1. James Monroe Long before he served as the fifth president, a young James Monroe fought in the Revolutionary War as an officer in the Continental Army. On Christmas Day 1776, he joined in the famous crossing of the icy Delaware River as part of General George Washington’s surprise attack on a garrison of 1,400 Hessians stationed in Trenton, New Jersey. Lieutenant Monroe was one of the first Americans to...

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