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Jackson said he should’ve hanged his vice president, Truman called Nixon “a no-good lying bastard.” Trash-talking your political opponent is an American tradition that began long before the age of Twitter. So is talking trash about your vice president, the president who appointed you, or the president you pardoned. With that in mind, here’s a look at some of the most memorable disses in presidential history.   1. Jackson reminds everyone that he’s killed before and he’ll do it again. Andrew Jackson’s only two regrets:“that I have not shot Henry Clay or hanged John C. Calhoun.” Well thanks for letting us...

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Frankin D. Roosevelt -

Born on January 30, 1882 in the Hudson Valley town of Hyde Park in New York—Franklin Delanor Roosevelt, commonly known as FDR, was brought up in a wealthy family and had success practically running through his fingertips. Throughout the entirety of his life he was constantly travelling to Europe and was able to learn German and French through his endeavors. Roosevelt attended public school in Germany up until the age of 9, was homeschooled for a while, then eventually went to Groton School (an Episcopal boarding school). When Roosevelt was ready to attend college, he went to Harvard to study...

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The world got to see a different side of Richard Nixon when his gushing, ardent love letters went on display at the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum in 2012. Find out more about these missives as well as other passionate presidents who penned doting dispatches.   1. Richard Nixon Richard and Pat Nixon, 1950s. (Credit: Howard Sochurek/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images) Long before anyone called him “tricky,” the man who would become the 37th U.S. president was seriously smitten. In 1938 Richard Nixon, then a young lawyer, landed a part in a community theater production. Fellow cast member Pat...

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Explore the boozy history of America’s chief executives with the author of a book on presidential vices. By the time a Philadelphia distiller appropriately named E.C. Booz began handing out free bottles of his Old Cabin Whiskey at campaign rallies for William Henry Harrison in 1840, American presidents had already established quite an intoxicating history. As author Brian Abrams details in his new book, “Party Like a President: True Tales of Inebriation, Lechery and Mischief from the Oval Office,” George Washington downed four glasses of Madeira every afternoon while his successor, John Adams, hoisted a tankard of hard cider for...

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The pardon is one of the most controversial presidential powers, but in some instances it has helped ease tensions, heal political wounds and even right historic wrongs.   1. The Whiskey Rebels (1795) The first ever act of presidential forgiveness came in the wake of an armed rebellion. Fed up with a costly federal tax on distilled spirits, in 1794 a group of whiskey-producing Pennsylvania farmers took to the streets and burned the home of a local tax inspector. The attack came on the heels of several other protests and many politicians—most notably Secretary Alexander Hamilton—argued that it threatened the...

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